Hellenica World

Anapidae

Cladus: Eukaryota
Supergroup: Opisthokonta
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Protostomia
Superphylum: Ecdysozoa
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Classis: Arachnida
Ordo: Araneae
Subordo: Araneomorphae
Infraordo: Araneomorphi
Series: Entelegynae
Superfamilia: Araneoidea
Familia: Anapidae
Genera: Acrobleps - Anapis - Anapisona - Caledanapis - Chasmocephalon - Comaroma - Conculus - Crassanapis - Crozetulus - Dippenaaria - Elanapis - Enielkenie - Forsteriola - Gaiziapis - Gertschanapis - Hickmanapis - Mandanapis - Maxanapis - Metanapis - Minanapis - Montanapis - Nortanapis - Novanapis - Octanapis - Paranapis - Pecanapis - Pseudanapis - Queenslanapis - Risdonius - Sheranapis - Sinanapis - Sofanapis - Spinanapis - Tasmanapis - Victanapis - Zangherella - Zealanapis

Name

Anapidae Simon, 1895

References

* Forster, R.R.; Platnick, N.I. 1989: A revision of the temperate South American and Australasian spiders of the family Anapidae (Araneae, Araneoidea). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 190: 1-139. [1]
* Platnick, N. I. 2009. The World Spider Catalog, version 9.5. American Museum of Natural History. [2]

Vernacular names
Internationalization
日本語: ヨリメグモ科
한국어: 도토리거미과

The Anapidae are a family of rather small spiders with 145 described species in 35 genera. Most species are less than 2 mm long[1].

In some species (such as Pseudanapis parocula) the pedipalps of the female are reduced to coxal stumps[1].

Anapidae generally live in leaf litter and moss on the floor of rain forest. Many build orb webs with a diameter of less than 3 cm.[1]


Distribution

Most genera inhabit New Zealand, Australia and Africa. However, several genera occur in Asia (Japan, China, Korea). Only Comaroma simoni and the three species of Zangherella are found in Europe; Gertschanapis shantzi and Comaroma mendocino live in the USA.[2]

Systematics

Although the Micropholcommatidae were synonymized with this family by Schütt (2003), this move was not followed by most researchers.

Genera


Anapis Simon, 1895 — Central to South America
Anapisona Gertsch, 1941 — Central to South America
Caledanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — New Caledonia
Chasmocephalon O. P-Cambridge, 1889 — Australia
Comaroma Bertkau, 1889 — Europe, USA, China, Korea, Japan
Conculus Komatsu, 1940 — New Guinea, Korea, Japan
Crassanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Chile, Argentina
Crozetulus Hickman, 1939 — Africa
Dippenaaria Wunderlich, 1995 — South Africa
Elanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Chile
Enielkenie Ono, 2007 — Taiwan
Forsteriola Brignoli, 1981 — Africa
Gertschanapis Platnick & Forster, 1990 — USA
Hickmanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Tasmania
Mandanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — New Caledonia
Maxanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Australia
Metanapis Brignoli, 1981 — Africa, Nepal
Minanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Chile, Argentina
Montanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — New Caledonia
Nortanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Australia
Novanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — New Zealand
Octanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Australia
Paranapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — New Zealand
Pecanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Chile
Pseudanapis Simon, 1905 — Central and South America, Africa, South Asia, New Guinea, Hong Kong
Queenslanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Australia
Risdonius Hickman, 1939 — Australia
Sheranapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Chile
Sinanapis Wunderlich & Song, 1995 — China
Sofanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Chile
Spinanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Australia
Tasmanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Tasmania
Victanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — Australia
Zangherella Caporiacco, 1949 — Mediterranean
Zealanapis Platnick & Forster, 1989 — New Zealand


See also

Footnotes

^ a b c Murphy & Murphy 2000
^ Platnick 2008


References

Ramirez, M.J. & Platnick, N.I. (1999): On Sofanapis antillanca (Araneae, Anapidae) as a kleptoparasite of austrochiline spiders (Araneae, Austrochilidae). Journal of Arachnology 27(2): 547-549. PDF
Murphy, Frances & Murphy, John (2000): An Introduction to the Spiders of South East Asia. Malaysian Nature Society, Kuala Lumpur.
Schütt, K. (2003): Phylogeny of Symphytognathidae. Zoologica Scripta 32: 129–151.
Platnick, Norman I. (2008): The world spider catalog, version 8.5. American Museum of Natural History.

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