Hellenica World

Staphylinidae

Cladus: Eukaryota
Supergroup: Opisthokonta
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Protostomia
Cladus: Ecdysozoa
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Hexapoda
Classis: Insecta
Cladus: Dicondylia
Cladus: Pterygota
Cladus: Metapterygota
Cladus: Neoptera
Cladus: Eumetabola
Cladus: Endopterygota
Superordo: Coleopterida
Ordo: Coleoptera
Subordo: Polyphaga
Infraordo: Staphyliniformia
Superfamilia: Staphylinoidea
Familia: Staphylinidae
Subfamiliae: Aleocharinae - Apateticinae - Brathininae - Dasycerinae - Empelinae - Euaesthetinae - Glypholomatinae - Habrocerinae - Leptotyphlinae - Megalopsidiinae - Micropeplinae - Microsilphinae - Neophoninae - Olisthaerinae - Omaliinae - Osoriinae - Oxyporinae - Oxytelinae - Paederinae - Phloeocharinae - Piestinae - Proteininae - Protopselaphinae - Pselaphinae - Pseudopsinae - Scaphidiinae - Scydmaeninae - Solieriinae - Staphylininae - Steninae - Tachyporinae - Trigonurinae - Trichophyinae

* omaliine group: Dasycerinae - Empelinae - Glypholomatinae - Micropeplinae - Microsilphinae - Neophoninae - Omaliinae - Proteininae - Protopselaphinae - Pselaphinae

* staphylinine group: Euaesthetinae - Leptotyphlinae - Megalopsidiinae - Oxyporinae - Paederinae - Pseudopsinae - Scydmaeninae - Solieriinae - Staphylininae - Steninae

* tachyporine group: Aleocharinae - Habrocerinae - Olisthaerinae - Phloeocharinae - Tachyporinae - Trichophyinae

Name

Staphylinidae Latreille, 1802
Synonyms

* Dasyceridae
* Pselaphidae
* Scaphidiidae
* Scydmaenidae

References

* Blackwelder, R.E. 1952: The generic names of the beetle family Staphylinidae, with an essay on genotypy. Bulletin of the United States National Museum, 200
* Grebennikov, V.V.; Newton, A.F. 2009: Good-bye Scydmaenidae, or why the ant-like stone beetles should become megadiverse Staphylinidae sensu latissimo (Coleoptera). European journal of entomology, 106: 275–301.
* Herman, L.H. 2001: Catalog of the Staphylinidae (Insecta, Coleoptera): 1758 to the end of the second millennium. I. Introduction, history, biographical sketches, and omaliine group. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, (265): 1–650.
* Herman, L.H. 2001: Catalog of the Staphylinidae (Insecta, Coleoptera): 1758 to the end of the second millennium. II. Tachyporine group. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, (265): 651–1066.
* Herman, L.H. 2001: Catalog of the Staphylinidae (Insecta, Coleoptera): 1758 to the end of the second millennium. III. Oxyteline group. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, (265): 1067–1806.
* Herman, L.H. 2001: Catalog of the Staphylinidae (Insecta, Coleoptera): 1758 to the end of the second millennium. IV. Staphylinine group (part 1) Euaesthetinae, Leptotyphlinae, Megalopsidiinae, Oxyporinae, Pseudopsinae, Solieriinae, Steninae. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, (265): 1807-1220.
* Herman, L.H. 2001: Catalog of the Staphylinidae (Insecta, Coleoptera): 1758 to the end of the second millennium. V. Staphylinine group (part 2) Staphylininae: Diochini, Maorothiini, Othiini, Platyprosopini, Staphylinini (Amblyopinina, Anisolinina, Hyptiomina, Philonthina). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, (265): 2441–3020.
* Herman, L.H. 2001: Catalog of the Staphylinidae (Insecta, Coleoptera): 1758 to the end of the second millennium. VI. Staphylinine group (part 3) Staphylininae: Staphylinini (Quediina, Staphylinina, Tanygnathinina, Xanthopygina), Xantholinini. Staphylinidae incertae sedis: fossils, Protactinae†. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, (265): 3021–3840.
* Herman, L.H. 2001: Catalog of the Staphylinidae (Insecta, Coleoptera): 1758 to the end of the second millennium. VII. Bibliography and index. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, (265): 3841-4218.
* Junk, W.; Schenkling, S. 1910: Coleopterorum Catalogus, Part 19 : Staphylinidae I.
* Klimaszewski, J.; Newton, A.F., jr.; Thayer, M.K. 1996: A review of the New Zealand rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). New Zealand journal of zoology, 23: 143-160. doi: 10.1080/03014223.1996.9518074
* Latreille, P.A. 1802: Histoire naturelle, générale et particulière des Crustacés et des Insectes. Tome 3. F. Dufart, Paris. Internet Archive BHL
* Majka, C.G.; Klimaszewski, J. 2008: Adventive Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) of the Maritime Provinces of Canada: further contributions. In: Majka, C.G.; Klimaszewski, J. (eds.) Biodiversity, biosystematics, and ecology of Canadian Coleoptera. ZooKeys, 2: 151-174. doi: 10.3897/zookeys.2.5
* Majka, C.G.; Klimaszewski, J.; Lauff, R.F. 2008: The coastal rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) of Atlantic Canada: a survey and new records. In: Majka, C.G.; Klimaszewski, J. (eds.) Biodiversity, biosystematics, and ecology of Canadian Coleoptera. ZooKeys, 2: 115-150. doi: 10.3897/zookeys.2.2
* Ribeiro-Costa, C.S. et al. 2010: Catalog of the types of some families of Coleoptera (Insecta) deposited at Coleção de Entomologia Pe. J. S. Moure, Curitiba, Brazil. Zootaxa, 2535: 1–34. Preview
* Catalogue of Palearctic Coleoptera. Vol. 2 ed. I. Lobl, & A. Smetana, Apollo Books, Stenstrup, Denmark, 2004
ISBN 87-88757-74-9, p.237

Links

* Australian Faunal Directory
* Scydmaenidae in SYNOPSIS OF THE DESCRIBED COLEOPTERA OF THE WORLD
* Staphylinidae in SYNOPSIS OF THE DESCRIBED COLEOPTERA OF THE WORLD
* Atlas of rove beatles (Staphylinidae) of Russia and adjacent countries [beetles]

Vernacular names
Česky: Drabčíkovití
Српски / Srpski: Краткокрилци
Dansk: Rovbille
Deutsch: Kurzflügler
English: rove beetles
Français: Les Staphylinidés
Lietuvių: Trumpasparniai
Magyar: Holyvák
Nederlands: Kortschildkevers
日本語: ハネカクシ科
‪Norsk (bokmål)‬: Kortvinger
Polski: Kusakowate
Русский: Стафилиниды
Svenska: Kortvingar
Türkçe: Cepkenli böcekgiller

The rove beetles are a large family (Staphylinidae) of beetles, primarily distinguished by their short elytra that leave more than half of their abdomens exposed. With over 46,000 species in thousands of genera, the group is the second largest family of beetles after the Curculionidae (the true weevils). It is an ancient group, with fossil rove beetles known from the Triassic, 200 million years ago.

One well-known species is the Devil's coach horse beetle. For some other species, see List of British rove beetles.

Anatomy

As might be expected for such a large family, there is considerable variation among the species. Sizes range from 1 to 35 mm (1.5 inches), with most in the 2-8 mm range, and the form is generally elongate, with some rove beetles being ovoid in shape. Colors range from yellow to reddish-brown to brown to black. The antennae are usually 11 segmented and filiform, with moderate clubbing in some genera. The abdomen may be very long and flexible, and some types of rove beetles superficially resemble earwigs.

The Paederus genus, such as the Nairobi fly, contain a potent toxin in their haemolymph which is highly irritating to the skin. The toxin, pederin, is highly toxic, more potent than cobra venom.[1]

Ecology

Rove beetles are known from every type of habitat that beetles occur in, and their diets include just about everything except the living tissues of higher plants. Most rove beetles are predators of insects and other kinds of invertebrates, living in forest leaf litter and similar kinds of decaying plant matter. They are also commonly found under stones, and around freshwater margins. Several types are known to live on ocean shores that are submerged at high tide, including the pictured rove beetle;[2] other species have adapted to live as inquilines in ant and termite colonies, and some live in mutualistic relationships with mammals whereby they eat fleas and other parasites, benefiting the host. A few species, notably those of the genus Aleochara, are parasitoids of other insects, particularly of certain fly pupae.

Although rove beetles' appetites for other insects would seem to make them obvious candidates for biological control of pests, and empirically they are believed to be important controls in the wild, experiments with using them have not been notably successful. Greater success is seen with those species (genus Aleochara) that are parasitoids.

Rove beetles of the genus Stenus are very interesting insects. They are specialist predators of small invertebrates such as collembola. Their labium can shoot out from the head using blood pressure. The thin rod of the labium ends in a pad of bristly hairs and hooks and between these hairs are small pores that exude an adhesive glue-like substance, which sticks to prey.[3]

Systematics

Classification of the 46,275 (as of 1998) staphylinid species is ongoing and controversial, with some workers proposing an organization of as many as ten separate families, but the current favored system is one of 31 subfamilies, about 100 tribes (some grouped into supertribes), and about 3,200 genera. About 400 new species are being described each year, and some estimates suggest 3/4 of tropical species are as yet undescribed.

References

1. ^ "Ectoparasites". Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. http://www.itg.be/itg/DistanceLearning/LectureNotesVandenEndenE/Teksten/sylabus/52_Ectoparasites.doc. Retrieved 2007-06-04.
2. ^ P. C. Craig (1970). "The behavior and distribution of the intertidal sand beetle, Thinopinus pictus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae)". Ecology 51 (6): 1012–1017. doi:10.2307/1933627. http://jstor.org/stable/1933627.
3. ^ Piper, Ross (2007), Extraordinary Animals: An Encyclopedia of Curious and Unusual Animals, Greenwood Press.

* Ross H. Arnett, Jr. and Michael C. Thomas, American Beetles (CRC Press, 2001), vol. 1


Important Works on Staphylinidae

For the Palaearctic Fauna the most up to date works are:

* Lohse, G.A. (1964) Familie: Staphylinidae. In: Freude, H., Harde, K.W. & Lohse, G.A. (Eds.), Die Käfer Mitteleuropas. Band 4, Staphylinidae I (Micropeplinae bis Tachyporinae). Krefeld: Goecke & Evers Verlag, 264 pp.
* Lohse, G.A. (1974) Familie: Staphylinidae. In: Freude, H., Harde, K.W. & Lohse, G.A. (Eds.), Die Käfer Mitteleuropas. Band 5, Staphylinidae II (Hypocyphtinae und Aleocharinae). Pselaphidae. Krefeld: Goecke & Evers Verlag, 381 pp.
* Lohse, G.A. (1989) Ergänzungen und Berichtigungen zu Freude-Harde-Lohse "Die Käfer Mitteleuropas" Band 5 (1974), pp. 185-243 In: Lohse, G.A. & Lucht, W.H. (Eds.), Die Käfer Mitteleuropas. 1. Supplementband mit Katalogteil. Krefeld: Goecke & Evers Verlag, pp. 185-243.


Regional Works

Europe

* Lott, D.A. (2009). The Staphylinidae (rove beetles) of Britain and Ireland. Part 5: Scaphidiinae, Piestinae, Oxytelinae. Handbooks for the identification of British insects, vol. 12, part 5. St Albans: Royal Entomological Society.British and Irish fauna only
* Tronquet, M. (2006). Catalogue iconographique des Coléoptères des Pyrénées-Orientales. Vol. 1: Staphylinidae. Supplément au Tome XV de la Revue de l’Association Roussillonnaise d’Entomologie. Perpignan: Association Roussillonnaise d’Entomologie.Extensively illustrated

Biology Encyclopedia

Insects Images

Source: Wikipedia, Wikispecies: All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

Index

Scientific Library - Scientificlib.com