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Superregnum: Eukaryota
Cladus: Unikonta
Cladus: Opisthokonta
Cladus: Holozoa
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Protostomia
Cladus: Ecdysozoa
Cladus: Panarthropoda
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Classis: Arachnida
Ordo: Araneae
Subordo: Opisthothelae
Infraordo: Araneomorphae
Taxon: Neocribellatae
Series: Entelegynae
Superfamilia: Uloboroidea

Familia: Uloboridae
Subfamiliae (4): Hyptiotinae - Miagrammopinae - Tangaroinae - Uloborinae
Overview of genera (18)

Ariston – Astavakra – Conifaber – Daramulunia – Hyptiotes – Lubinella – Miagrammopes – Octonoba – Orinomana – Philoponella – Polenecia – Purumitra – Siratoba – Sybota – Tangaroa – Uloborus – Waitkera – Zosis
Name

Uloboridae Thorell, 1869
References

Opell, B.D. 1979: Revision of the genera and tropical American species of the spider family Uloboridae. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, 148(10): 443–549. [Publication date: '27 August 1979', sourced from title page of issue] BHL

Links

Platnick, N. I. 2008. The World Spider Catalog, version 9.0. American Museum of Natural History. [1]
Joel Hallan's Biology Catalog

Vernacular names
Deutsch: Kräuselradnetzspinnen
English: Hackled orb-weaver
日本語: ウズグモ科
한국어: 응달거미과
中文: 涡蛛科

Uloboridae is a family of non-venomous spiders, known as cribellate orb weavers or hackled orb weavers. Their lack of venom glands is a secondarily evolved trait. Instead, they wrap their prey thoroughly in silk, cover it in regurgitated digestive enzymes, and then ingest the liquified body.[1]

All members of this family produce a feathery, fuzzy silk called cribellate (or hackled) silk.[2] These spiders do not use an adhesive on their orb webs, but rather the very fine fibers on each strand of silk tend to ensnare prey. Uloboridae webs often have a stabilimentum or zig-zag pattern through the center.

Distribution

This family has an almost worldwide distribution. Only two species are known from Northern Europe: Uloborus walckenaerius and Hyptiotes paradoxus. Similarly occurring solely in northern North America (e.g. southern Ontario) is Uloborus glomosus. The oldest known fossil species is Talbragaraneus from the Late Jurassic (Tithonian) Talbragar Fossil Bed of Australia.[3]
Genera
Main article: List of Uloboridae species

As of April 2019, the World Spider Catalog accepts the following genera:[4]

Ariston O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896 – Mexico, Panama
Astavakra Lehtinen, 1967 – Philippines
Conifaber Opell, 1982 – Paraguay, Argentina, Colombia
Daramulunia Lehtinen, 1967 – Samoa, Vanuatu, Fiji
Hyptiotes Walckenaer, 1837 – Asia, South Africa, North America, Europe
Lubinella Opell, 1984 – Papua New Guinea
Miagrammopes O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1870 – South America, Central America, Asia, Oceania, Africa, Caribbean, North America
Octonoba Opell, 1979 – Asia, United States
Orinomana Strand, 1934 – South America
Philoponella Mello-Leitão, 1917 – Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Australia, Central America
Polenecia Lehtinen, 1967 – Azerbaijan
Purumitra Lehtinen, 1967 – Australia, Philippines
Siratoba Opell, 1979 – United States, Mexico
Sybota Simon, 1892 – Chile, Argentina
Tangaroa Lehtinen, 1967 – Vanuatu
Uaitemuri Santos & Gonzaga, 2017 – Brazil
Uloborus Latreille, 1806 – Asia, Oceania, South America, Africa, North America, Costa Rica, Europe
Waitkera Opell, 1979 – New Zealand
Zosis Walckenaer, 1841 – South America, Seychelles, Asia, Oceania, Cuba

See also

List of Uloboridae species

References

"Staff Scientists" (PDF).
Jonathan A. Coddington & Herbert W. Levi (1991). "Systematics and evolution of spiders (Araneae)" (PDF). Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics. 22: 565–592. doi:10.1146/annurev.ecolsys.22.1.565. JSTOR 2097274. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-04-02.
Selden, Paul A.; Beattie, Robert G. (June 2013). "A spider fossil from the Jurassic Talbragar Fossil Fish Bed of New South Wales". Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology. 37 (2): 203–208. doi:10.1080/03115518.2013.735072. ISSN 0311-5518. S2CID 55113970.

"Family: Uloboridae Thorell, 1869". World Spider Catalog. Natural History Museum Bern. Retrieved 2019-04-26.

Brent D. Opell (1984). "Lubinella, a new genus of Uloboridae (Arachnida, Araneae)" (PDF). Journal of Arachnology. 11 (3): 441–446. JSTOR 3705054.

Images

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