Anas falcata

Anas falcata (*)

Cladus: Eukaryota
Supergroup: Opisthokonta
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Deuterostomia
Phylum: Chordata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Infraphylum: Gnathostomata
Superclassis: Tetrapoda
Classis: Aves
Subclassis: Carinatae
Infraclassis: Neornithes
Parvclassis: Neognathae
Ordo: Anseriformes
Familia: Anatidae
Subfamilia: Anatinae
Genus: Anas
Species: Anas falcata


Anas falcata Georgi, 1775


* Bemerk.ReiseRuss.Reich p.167
* Anas falcata Report on ITIS

Vernacular names
Български: Сърпокрила патица
Česky: Čírka srpoperá
English: Falcated Duck
Español: Cerceta de alfanjes
Français: Canard à faucilles
Magyar: Sarlós réce
日本語: ヨシガモ
한국어: 청머리오리
‪Norsk (bokmål)‬: Sibirand
Svenska: Praktand
中文: 罗纹鸭

The Falcated Duck or Falcated Teal (Anas falcata) is a Gadwall-sized dabbling duck.


The closest relative of this species is the Gadwall, followed by the wigeons.[2]

Distribution and habitat

The Falcated duck breeds in eastern Asia. It nests in eastern Russia, in Khabarovsk, Primorskiy, Amur, Chita, Buryatia, Irkutsk, Tuva, eastern Krasnoyarsk, south central Sakha Sakhalin, extreme northeastern North Korea and northern China, in northeastern Inner Mongolia, and northern Heilongjiang, and in northern Japan, Hokkaidō, Aomori, and the Kuril Islands[3]. It is widely recorded well outside its normal range, but the popularity of this beautiful duck in captivity clouds the origins of these extralimital birds.

This dabbling duck is strongly migratory and winters in much of Southeast Asia. In India: Uttar Pradesh, Bihār, Assam, eastern Haryāna. Also in northern Bangladesh, northern and central Myanmar, northern Laos to the Mekong River, northern Vietnam (from about Hanoi north), and China: Hainan, Taiwan, Yunnan, Guangxi Zhuang, Guangdong, Fujian, Jiangxi, northern Hunan, Hubei, Zhejiang, Anhui, Jiangsu, Shandong, southern Hebei, Shanxi, northern Shaanxi[3]. It is gregarious outside the breeding season and will then form large flocks.

This is a species of lowland wetlands, such as water meadows or lakes, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing. It nests on the ground, near water and under the cover of taller vegetation. The clutch is 6–10 eggs.


This is a at 48–54 cm length. The breeding male is unmistakable. Most of the body plumage is finely vermiculated grey, with the long sickle-shaped tertials, which give this species its name, hanging off its back. The large head is dark green with a white throat, and a dark green collar and bronzed crown)[4]. The vent region is patterned in yellow, black and white.

The female Falcated Duck is dark brown, with plumage much like a female wigeon. Its long grey bill is an aid to identification[4]. The eclipse male is like the female, but darker on the back and head. In flight both sexes show a pale grey underwing. The blackish speculum is bordered with a white bar on its inner edge[4]. Young birds are buffer than the female and have short tertials.

The male Falcated Duck has a clear low whistle, whereas the female has a gruff "quack".


It has a conservation status of Near Threatened[1].


1. ^ a b IUCN (2009)
2. ^ Johnson, Kevin P; Sorenson, Michael D (July 1999). "Phylogeny and biogeography of dabbling ducks (genus: Anas): A comparison of molecular and morphological evidence" (PDF). The Auk 116 (3): 792–805.
3. ^ a b Clements, J. (2007)
4. ^ a b c Dunn, J. (2006)


* Clements, James, (2007) The Clements Checklist of the Birds of the World, Cornell University Press, Ithaca
* IUCN (2009) BirdLife International Anas falcata Downloaded on 8 Jan 2009
* Dunn, J. & Alderfer, J. (2006) National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America 5th Ed.
* Madge, Steve; Burn, Hilary (1988). Wildfowl: An Identification Guide to the Ducks, Geese and Swans of the World (Helm Identification Guides). Christopher Helm. ISBN 0-7470-2201-1.

Biology Encyclopedia

Birds Images

Source: Wikipedia, Wikispecies: All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License


Scientific Library -