Allium acuminatum

Allium acuminatum

Allium acuminatum

Cladus: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Divisio: Magnoliophyta
Classis: Liliopsida
Subclassis: Liliidae
Ordo: Asparagales
Familia: Alliaceae
Genus: Allium
Species: Allium acuminatum

Name

Allium acuminatum, Hook.

References

USDA, NRCS. 2006. The PLANTS Database, 6 March 2006 (http://plants.usda.gov). Data compiled from various sources by Mark W. Skinner. National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

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Allium acuminatum , also known as the tapertip onion or Hooker's onion, a species in the genus Allium and is native to the Western United States and Canada. Its bulbs are small and spherical and smell like onions.[1] The flowers are pink to purple on a long stem which appear after the leaves have died.

The onions were eaten by first peoples in southern British Columbia. They were harvested in either early spring or late fall and usually cooked in pits.[1]

References

1. ^ a b Turner, Nancy J. Food Plants of Interior First Peoples (Victoria: UBC Press, 1997) ISBN 0-7748-0606-0

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