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Crotalaria

Cladus: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Divisio: Magnoliophyta
Classis: Magnoliopsida
Subclassis: Rosidae
Ordo: Fabales
Familia: Fabaceae
Subfamilia: Faboideae
Tribus: Crotalarieae
Genus: Crotalaria
Species: C. abbreviata - C. acicularis - C. aculeata - C. agatiflora - C. alata - C. albicaulis - C. albida - C. alexandri - C. angulata - C. anisophylla - C. anthyllopsis - C. argyraea - C. argyrolobioides - C. aridicola - C. assamica - C. atrorubens - C. avonensis - C. axillaris - C. balansae - C. barkae - C. barnabassii - C. beddomeana - C. bequaertii - C. berteroana - C. brachycarpa - C. bracteata - C. brevidens - C. breviflora - C. brevis - C. burhia - C. burkeana - C. cajanifolia - C. calycina - C. candicans - C. capensis - C. caudata - C. cephalotes - C. chinensis - C. chirindae - C. chrysochlora - C. cleomifolia - C. collina - C. comosa - C. crispata - C. cunninghamii - C. cylindrocarpa - C. cylindrostachys - C. cytisoides - C. damarensis - C. deserticola - C. digitata - C. dissitiflora - C. distans - C. distantiflora - C. doidgeae - C. doniana - C. dura - C. erecta - C. eremaea - C. eremicola - C. excisa - C. ferruginea - C. fiherenensis - C. filicaulis - C. filifolia - C. filipes - C. flavicarinata - C. gazensis - C. glauca - C. glaucoides - C. globifera - C. goreensis - C. grahamiana - C. hainanensis - C. hebecarpa - C. heidmannii - C. holosericea - C. humifusa - C. humilis - C. hyssopifolia - C. impressa - C. incana - C. insignis - C. juncea - C. kapirensis - C. kipandensis - C. laburnifolia - C. laburnoides - C. lachnocarpoides - C. lachnophora - C. lachnosema - C. lanceolata - C. lasiocarpa - C. lathyroides - C. lebrunii - C. leptostachya - C. leubnitziana - C. linifolia - C. longirostrata - C. longithyrsa - C. lotoides - C. lukwangulensis - C. macrocarpa - C. madurensis - C. mauensis - C. maypurensis - C. medicaginea - C. mesopontica - C. meyeriana - C. micans - C. microcarpa - C. mitchellii - C. mohlenbrockii - C. monteiroi - C. mysorensis - C. nana - C. natalitia - C. nitens - C. novae-hollandiae - C. obscura - C. ochroleuca - C. ononoides - C. oocarpa - C. orientalis - C. orixensis - C. orthoclada - C. pallida - C. pallidicaulis - C. paulina - C. perrottetii - C. phylicoides - C. pilosa - C. pisicarpa - C. platysepala - C. podocarpa - C. polysperma - C. prostrata - C. pumila - C. purshii - C. pusilla - C. quinquefolia - C. recta - C. reptans - C. retusa - C. rhodesiae - C. rogersii - C. rotundifolia - C. sagittalis - C. saharae - C. saltiana - C. schinzii - C. schlechteri - C. semperflorens - C. senegalensis - C. sessiliflora - C. shirensis - C. sparsifolia - C. spartea - C. spartioides - C. speciosa - C. spectabilis - C. sphaerocarpa - C. spinosa - C. steudneri - C. stipularia - C. stolzii - C. subcapitata - C. tenuirama - C. tetragona - C. trichotoma - C. trifoliastrum - C. triquetra - C. uncinella - C. valida - C. vallicola - C. variegata - C. vasculosa - C. velutina - C. verrucosa - C. vestita - C. virgulata - C. virgultalis - C. vitellina - C. walkeri

Name

Crotalaria L.

Crotalaria is a genus of herbaceous plants and woody shrubs in the Family Fabaceae (Subfamily Faboideae) commonly known as rattlepods. Some 600 or more species of Crotalaria are described worldwide, mostly from the tropics; at least 500 species are known from Africa. Some species of Crotalaria are grown as ornamentals. The common name rattlepod or rattlebox is derived from the fact that the seeds become loose in the pod as they mature, and rattle when the pod is shaken. The name derives from the Greek, κροταλον, meaning "castanet", and is the same root as the name for the rattlesnakes (Crotalus).

Crotalaria species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Endoclita sericeus, Etiella Zinckenella and Utetheisa ornatrix. The toxic alakaloids produced by some members of this genus are known to be incorporated by Utetheisia larvae and used to secure their defense from predators. (Eisner et al., 2003)

* Crotalaria spectabilis Roth was introduced to the US from India for green manure. As a legume that supports nitrogen fixing bacteria, it is considered a "soil builder." However, it is also poisonous to cattle (as are many legumes), and has spread rapidly throughout the Southeastern United States where it is now considered an invasive species.

Alkaloid monocrotaline, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid, the main toxic principle of Crotalaria spectabilis, is used to induce experimental pulmonary hypertension in laboratory animals[1]. Larvae of the Ornate moth feed on the plant and re-purpose the poisonous compound as a defense, excreting it when they are threated by potential predation.

* Crotalaria longirostrata, also known as "longbeak rattlebox" or as "chipilín", is a common leafy vegetable in Oaxaca and Central America. It is considered a weed in the United States.

References

1. ^ P. M. Werchan, W. R. Summer, A. M. Gerdes and K. H. McDonough. Right ventricular performance after monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. Am. J. Physiol. Heart. Circ. Physiol. 256: H1328-H1336, 1989 [1]

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Source: Wikipedia, Wikispecies: All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License