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In algebraic geometry, a noetherian scheme is a scheme that admits a finite covering by open affine subsets \( \operatorname{Spec} A_i, A_i \) noetherian rings. More generally, a scheme is locally noetherian if it is covered by spectra of noetherian rings. Thus, a scheme is noetherian if and only if it is locally noetherian and quasi-compact. As with noetherian rings, the concept is named after Emmy Noether.

It can be shown that, in a locally noetherian scheme, if \operatorname{Spec} \) A is an open affine subset, then A is a noetherian ring. In particular, \(\operatorname{Spec} A is a noetherian scheme if and only if A is a noetherian ring. Let X be a locally noetherian scheme. Then the local rings \(\mathcal{O}_{X, x} \) are noetherian rings.

A noetherian scheme is a noetherian topological space. But the converse is false in general; consider, for example, the spectrum of a non-noetherian valuation ring.

The definitions extend to formal schemes.
References

Robin Hartshorne, Algebraic geometry.

Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics

Graduate Texts in Mathematics

Graduate Studies in Mathematics

Mathematics Encyclopedia

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