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Classification System: APG IV

Superregnum: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiosperms
Cladus: Monocots
Ordo: Asparagales

Familia: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamilia: Allioideae
Tribus: Allieae
Genus: Allium
Species: Allium elmendorfii
Name

Allium elmendorfii M.E.Jones ex Ownbey
References

USDA, NRCS. 2006. The PLANTS Database, 6 March 2006 (http://plants.usda.gov). Data compiled from various sources by Mark W. Skinner. National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.
USDA NRCS PLANTS Profile

Vernacular names
English: Elmendorf's onion

Allium elmendorfii is a species of wild onion endemic to Texas. It is known only from Bexar, Frio, Wilson, and Atascosa Counties. It is generally found on sandy soils,[2] specifically "well-drained sands, Eocene, Pleistocene and Holocene sands, and has only a 400 x 160 km range." Its habitat is "Forest/Woodland, Savanna, Woodland - Hardwood" and specifically "{g}rassland openings in post oak (Quercus stellata) woodlands on deep, well-drained sands derived from Queen City and similar Eocene formations."[1]

Allium elmendorfii is a perennial bulb-forming herb with clusters of small bulbils around the roots, but without the dry papery outer layers that the domesticated onions have. It has an umbel of 10-30 erect to spreading flowers, each with 6 white to pinkish tepals about 5 cm (2 inches) long,[2][3][4][5][6][7] flowering from March to April or May.[1]
Distribution

U.S. Distribution by County *Extirpated/possibly extirpated
State County Name (FIPS Code)
TX Atascosa (48013)*, Bee (48025)*, Bexar (48029)*, Gillespie (48171)*, Jim Wells (48249), Kenedy (48261)*, Live Oak (48297), Llano (48299)*, Nueces (48355), Refugio (48391), San Patricio (48409), Willacy (48489)*, Wilson (48493)

[1]
Uses

Allium elmendorfii is related to the common domesticated onion, Allium cepa L., and has a similar aroma. It can be eaten in the same manner, as can most of the members of the genus.
References

"NatureServe Explorer 2.0".
Flora of North America, vol 26, p 255.
Poole, J.M. et al. 2007. Rare Plants of Texas, Texas A&M Nature Guides, page 72.
Carr, W.R. 2005. University of Texas at Austin, photo
Ownbey, Francis Marion. 1950. Research Studies of the State College of Washington 18(4): 218–219, f. 8.
Correll, D. S. & M. C. Johnston. 1970. Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texasi–xv, 1–1881. The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.

Traub, H. P. 1968. New Guatemalan and Mexican Alliums. Plant Life 24(2–4): 127–142.

Citation for data on website including State Distribution, Watershed, and Reptile Range maps: NatureServe. 2018. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available http://explorer.natureserve.org. (Accessed: March 21, 2019 ).

Citation for Bird Range Maps of North America: Ridgely, R.S., T.F. Allnutt, T. Brooks, D.K. McNicol, D.W. Mehlman, B.E. Young, and J.R. Zook. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Birds of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Bird Range Maps of North America: "Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Robert Ridgely, James Zook, The Nature Conservancy - Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International - CABS, World Wildlife Fund - US, and Environment Canada - WILDSPACE."

Citation for Mammal Range Maps of North America: Patterson, B.D., G. Ceballos, W. Sechrest, M.F. Tognelli, T. Brooks, L. Luna, P. Ortega, I. Salazar, and B.E. Young. 2003. Digital Distribution Maps of the Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, version 1.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Mammal Range Maps of North America: "Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Bruce Patterson, Wes Sechrest, Marcelo Tognelli, Gerardo Ceballos, The Nature Conservancy-Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International-CABS, World Wildlife Fund-US, and Environment Canada-WILDSPACE."

Citation for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere: IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe. 2004. Global Amphibian Assessment. IUCN, Conservation International, and NatureServe, Washington, DC and Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Acknowledgement Statement for Amphibian Range Maps of the Western Hemisphere: "Data developed as part of the Global Amphibian Assessment and provided by IUCN-World Conservation Union, Conservation International and NatureServe."

NOTE: Full metadata for the Bird Range Maps of North America is available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20160616213828/http://www.natureserve.org/library/birdDistributionmapsmetadatav1.pdf.

Full metadata for the Mammal Range Maps of North America is available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20160616213504/http://www.natureserve.org/library/mammalsDistributionmetadatav1.pdf.

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