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Table Rock Allium Parvum

Classification System: APG IV

Superregnum: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiosperms
Cladus: Monocots
Ordo: Asparagales

Familia: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamilia: Allioideae
Tribus: Allieae
Genus: Allium
Species: Allium parvum
Name

Allium parvum Kellogg, 1863
Synonyms

Allium modocense Jeps.
Allium pleianthum var. particolor M.E.Jones
Allium tribracteatum var. andersonii S.Watson
Allium tribracteatum var. parvum (Kellogg) Jeps.

Distribution
Native distribution areas:

Continental: Northern America
Regional: Southwestern USA
California; Idaho; Nevada; Oregon; Utah

References: Brummitt, R.K. 2001. TDWG – World Geographical Scheme for Recording Plant Distributions, 2nd Edition
References

Kellogg, A., Proc. Calif. Acad. Sci. 3: 54 1863.
USDA, NRCS. 2006. The PLANTS Database, 6 March 2006 (http://plants.usda.gov). Data compiled from various sources by Mark W. Skinner. National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

Links

International Plant Names Index. 2017. Allium parvum. Published online. Accessed: Sep. 11 2017.
The Plant List 2013. Allium parvum in The Plant List Version 1.1. Published online. Accessed: 2017 Sep. 11.
Tropicos.org 2017. Allium parvum. Missouri Botanical Garden. Published online. Accessed: 11 Sep. 2017.
Govaerts, R. et al. 2017. Allium parvum in World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published online. Accessed: 2017 Sep 11. Reference page.

Vernacular names
English: small onion

Allium parvum is an American species of wild onion known by the common name small onion.[4][5] It is native to the western United States where it is a common member of the flora in rocky, dry areas in mountainous areas, especially in talus at elevations of 1,200–2,800 m (3,900–9,200 ft). It is widespread in California, Nevada, Oregon and Idaho, and also reported from western Utah and from extreme southwestern Montana (Ravalli and Beaverhead Counties)[6][7][8]

Allium parvum has a bulb one to two and a half centimeters wide and bears a relatively short scape for an onion species, rarely more than 12 centimeters tall. The two leaves are sickle-shaped. Atop the stem is an umbel of fewer than 30 flowers, which are generally pale pink with prominent dark midveins. Anthers are purple or yellow; pollen yellow.[5][9][10][11][12]
Uses

This plant was a food and flavoring for the Paiute people.[13][14]
References

The Plant List
Tropicos
Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
Calflora, Taxon Report 222, Allium parvum Kellogg
USDA Plants Profile
Jepson Manual Treatment
Flora of North America v 26 p 271, Allium parvum
BONAP (Biota of North America Program) 2014 county distribution map, Allium parvum
Calphoto Photo gallery
Hickman, J. C. 1993. The Jepson Manual: Higher Plants of California 1–1400. University of California Press, Berkeley.
Cronquist, A.J., A. H. Holmgren, N. H. Holmgren & Reveal. 1977. Vascular Plants of the Intermountain West, U.S.A. 6: 1–584. In A.J. Cronquist, A. H. Holmgren, N. H. Holmgren, J. L. Reveal & P. K. Holmgren (eds.) Intermountain Flora. Hafner Pub. Co., New York.
Kellogg, Albert. 1863. Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences 3(3): 54-55, figure 13 in English; full-page line drawing on page 55
Ethnobotany, University of Michigan
Fowler, Catherine S. 1989 Willards Z. Park's Ethnographic Notes on the Northern Paiute of Western Nevada 1933-1940. Salt Lake City. University of Utah Press (p. 44)

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