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Classification System: APG IV

Superregnum: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiosperms
Cladus: Eudicots
Cladus: Core eudicots
Cladus: Rosids
Cladus: Eurosids I
Ordo: Fabales

Familia: Fabaceae
Subfamilia: Caesalpinioideae
Tribus: Caesalpinieae
Genus: Pterogyne
Species: P. nitens
Name

Pterogyne Tul., Ann. Sci. Nat., Bot., sér. 2, 20: 140 (1843)

monotypic taxon

Homonyms

Pterogyne Schrad. ex Nees = Cyperus L.

Distribution
Native distribution areas:

Continental: Southern America
Regional: Western South America
Bolivia
Regional: Brazil
Brazil Northeast, Brazil South, Brazil Southeast, Brazil West-Central
Regional: Southern South America
Argentina Northeast, Argentina Northwest, Paraguay, Uruguay
Introduced into: Kenya, Uganda

References: Brummitt, R.K. 2001. TDWG – World Geographical Scheme for Recording Plant Distributions, 2nd Edition
References
Primary references

Tulasne, L.-R. 1843. Nova quædam proponit genera in Leguminosarum classe. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Botanique, série 2, 20: 136–144. BHL Reference page.

Links

Govaerts, R. et al. 2021. Pterogyne in Kew Science Plants of the World online. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published online. Accessed: 2021 August 22. Reference page.
International Plant Names Index. 2021. Pterogyne. Published online. Accessed: 22 August 2021.
Tropicos.org 2021. Pterogyne. Missouri Botanical Garden. Published online. Accessed: 22 August 2021.
USDA, ARS, Germplasm Resources Information Network. Pterogyne in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Accessed: 22 August 2021.

Pterogyne is a monotypic genus in the legume family, Fabaceae. The sole species is Pterogyne nitens. Spanish common names include guiraró, palo coca, or tipa colorado.[1] In Portuguese, it is commonly known as amendoim bravo, cocal or madeira nova. It is found in Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia and Argentina.[1] It is threatened by habitat loss and harvesting for timber.[1]

Five guanidine alkaloid natural products were isolated from the leaves of Pterogyne nitens: nitensidine D, nitensidine E, pterogynine, pterogynidine, and galegine.[3]
References

Prado, D. (1998). "Pterogyne nitens". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 1998: e.T32977A9739802.

Plants Images

Biology Encyclopedia

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