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Cladus: Eukaryota
Supergroup: Opisthokonta
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Deuterostomia
Phylum: Chordata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Infraphylum: Gnathostomata
Superclassis: Tetrapoda
Classis: Amphibia
Subclassis: Lissamphibia
Ordo: Anura
Subordo: Neobatrachia
Familia: Microhylidae
Subfamilia: Asterophryinae
Genera: Albericus - Aphantophryne - Asterophrys - Austrochaperina - Barygenys - Callulops - Choerophryne - Cophixalus - Copiula - Genyophryne - Hylophorbus - Liophryne - Mantophryne - Metamagnusia - Oreophryne - Oxydactyla - Paedophryne - Pherohapsis - Pseudocallulops - Sphenophryne - Xenorhina

Name

Asterophryinae Günther, 1858

Type genus: Asterophrys Tschudi, 1838

Synonyms

* Asterophrydidae Günther, 1858
* Asterophrydina — Mivart, 1869
* Xenorhinidae Mivart, 1869
* Genyophrynidae Boulenger, 1890
* Genyophryninae — Gadow, 1901
* Genyophrynidae — Van Kampen, 1919
* Asterophryidae — Fejérváry, 1923
* Asterophrynae — Fejérváry, 1923
* Sphenophryninae Noble, 1931
* Asterophrynidae — Parker, 1940
* Asterophryninae — Tamarunov, 1964
* Phrynomantini Burton, 1986
* Asterophrynini — Burton, 1986
* Barygenini Burton, 1986
* Xenorhinini — Burton, 1986
* Callulopini Dubois, 1988


References

* Günther, 1858, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, 1858: 346.
* Günther, R. 2009: Metamagnusia and Pseudocallulops, two new genera of microhylid frogs from New Guinea (Amphibia, Anura, Microhylidae). Zoosystematics and evolution, 85: 171-187. doi: 10.1002/zoos.200900002
* Kraus, F. 2010: New genus of diminutive microhylid frogs from Papua New Guinea. ZooKeys, 48: 39–59. ISSN: 1313-2970 (online) ISSN: 1313-2989 (print) doi: 10.3897/zookeys.48.446
* Amphibian Species of the World 5.1 Asterophryinae access date 12 June 2008


Vernacular names
English: Narrow-mouthed Toads

Asterophryinae is a subfamily of microhylid frogs distributed in an area from the Peninsular Malaysia through the Malay Archipelago to northern Australia.[2]

Genera

The following genera are recognised in the subfamily Asterophryinae:[2]

Aphantophryne Fry, 1917
Asterophrys Tschudi, 1838
Austrochaperina Fry, 1912
Barygenys Parker, 1936
Callulops Boulenger, 1888
Choerophryne Van Kampen, 1914
Cophixalus Boettger, 1892
Copiula Méhely, 1901
Gastrophrynoides Noble, 1926
Hylophorbus Macleay, 1878
Mantophryne Boulenger, 1897
Oninia Günther, Stelbrink, and von Rintelen, 2010
Oreophryne Boettger, 1895
Paedophryne Kraus, 2010
Siamophryne Suwannapoom, Sumontha, Tunprasert, Ruangsuwan, Pawangkhanant, Korost & Poyarkov, 2018
Sphenophryne Peters and Doria, 1878
Vietnamophryne Poyarkov, Suwannapoom, Pawangkhanant, Aksornneam, Duong, Korost, & Che, 2018
Xenorhina Peters, 1863 (synonym: Xenobatrachus Peters and Doria, 1878)

The most species-rich genus is Oreophryne (71 species). Two genera are monotypic: Oninia and Siamophryne.[2]

The genera Siamophryne and Vietnamophryne were added to Asterophryinae in 2018.

Body size

Phylogeny and evolution of body size in Asterophryinae. Colours of branches correspond to maximum male snout-vent length (Paedophryne) or average snout-vent length within each clade on a logarithmic scale.[3]

Microhylid frogs are generally small. A few species such as Callulops robustus and Asterophrys turpicola attain snout-vent lengths (SVL) in excess of 50 mm (2.0 in), whereas frogs in genus Paedophryne are particularly small, and Paedophryne amauensis is the world's smallest known vertebrate, attaining an average body size of only 7.7 mm (0.30 in) (range 7.0–8.0 mm).[3]

References

"Genyophryninae". Integrated Taxonomic Information System.
Frost, Darrel R. (2013). "Asterophryinae Günther, 1858". Amphibian Species of the World 5.6, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 20 September 2013.
Rittmeyer, Eric N.; Allison, Allen; Gründler, Michael C.; Thompson, Derrick K.; Austin, Christopher C. (2012). "Ecological guild evolution and the discovery of the world's smallest vertebrate". PLoS ONE. 7 (1): e29797. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029797. PMC 3256195. PMID 22253785.

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