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Superregnum: Eukaryota
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Superphylum: Deuterostomia
Phylum: Chordata
Cladus: Craniata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Infraphylum: Gnathostomata
Superclassis: Tetrapoda
Cladus: Reptiliomorpha
Cladus: Amniota
Classis: Reptilia
Cladus: Eureptilia
Cladus: Romeriida
Subclassis: Diapsida
Cladus: Sauria
Infraclassis: Archosauromorpha
Cladus: Crurotarsi
Divisio: Archosauria
Subsectio: Ornithodira
Subtaxon: Dinosauromorpha
Cladus: Dinosauria
Ordo: Saurischia
Cladus: Theropoda
Cladus: Neotheropoda
Infraclassis: Aves
Cladus: Euavialae
Cladus: Avebrevicauda
Cladus: Pygostylia
Cladus: Ornithothoraces
Cladus: Euornithes
Cladus: Ornithuromorpha
Cladus: Ornithurae
Cladus: Carinatae
Parvclassis: Neornithes
Cohors: Neognathae
Ordo: Falconiformes

Familia: Falconidae
Subfamilia: Falconinae
Genera: Falco - Microhierax - Polihierax
Name

Falconinae
Vernacular names
polski: Sokoły

Falconinae is a subfamily of falconid birds of prey that includes 44 species in three genera. It includes Microhierax (the typical falconets), Polihierax (the pygmy falcons), and Falco (the falcons). Molecular data since 2015 has found support in the grouping of these genera, with Polihierax being paraphyletic in respect to Falco.[1][2][3] Falconinae and their sister taxon, Polyborinae, split off from Herpetotherinae around 30.2 million years ago in the Oligocene epoch.[3] Falconines split off from the polyborines around 20 million years ago in the Miocene epoch.[1]
References

Fuchs, J.; Johnson, J. A.; Mindell, D. P. (2015). "Rapid diversification of falcons (Aves: Falconidae) due to expansion of open habitats in the Late Miocene". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 82: 166–182. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2014.08.010. PMID 25256056.
Wink, M. (2018). "Phylogeny of Falconidae and phylogeography of Peregrine Falcons". Ornis Hungarica. 26 (2): 27–37. doi:10.1515/orhu-2018-0013. S2CID 91204703.
Mindell, M. D.; Fuchs, J.; Johnson, J. A. (2018). "Phylogeny, Taxonomy, and Geographic Diversity of Diurnal Raptors: Falconiformes, Accipitriformes, and Cathartiformes". In Sarasola, J.; Grande, J.; Negro, J. (eds.). Birds of Prey: Biology and conservation in the XXI century. Springer, Chame. pp. 3–32. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-73745-4_1. ISBN 978-3-319-73745-4.

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